Grand Rounds
  Most Recent Cases
  Dates of Case
  Type of Case
  Submit a Grand Round.
  Register with DJO to receive personalized updates.

If you're already a
member, please sign in.
A 66-year-old woman with extensive conjunctival melanosis
Digital Journal of Ophthalmology 2014
Volume 20, Number 2
May 8, 2014
DOI: 10.5693/djo.03.2013.12.002
Printer Friendly



Helen Merritt, MD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Ruiz Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston
Mathieu Bakhoum, PhD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
Matthew Sniegowski, MD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
Bita Esmaeli, MD | Orbital Oncology & Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Program, Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
Differential Diagnosis
The differential diagnosis of conjunctival pigmentation includes conjunctival nevus, racial melanosis, primary acquired melanosis, secondary acquired melanosis, and conjunctival melanoma. Secondary acquired melanosis may be due to previous irradiation, hormonal changes, metabolic disorders, chemical exposure, topical glaucoma medications, or chronic inflammatory disorders of the eye.(1) Several cases of secondary acquired melanosis of the conjunctiva with findings similar to our patient’s findings attributable to perforating injury or iris trauma have been reported.(2-6)
top